Mum issues warning after she spotted a little-known detail on Aldi’s $1.25 ‘miracle’ product

A mum has issued a warning about the common cleaning mistake many people make after she spotted a little-known detail on Aldi’s $1.25 ‘miracle’ product. 

Anne explained that the Di-San Pre Wash Stain Remover spray should never be mixed with other cleaning products as the chemicals can release toxic fumes.

She said she only noticed the warning on the back of the popular spray after she experienced headaches and nausea when she unintentionally mixed two different cleaning products to clean her home. 

The budget buy has a huge following for removing tough stains instantly from carpets, bathroom tiles, couches, sneakers, clothing and more. 

A mum has issued a warning about Aldi Australia's popular $1.25 Di-San Pre Wash Stain Remover spray after noticing a little-known detail on the product

Anne posted to the Aldi Mums Facebook page and said the product should not be mixed with other chemicals as the strong smell can cause headaches and nausea

Anne posted to the Aldi Mums Facebook page and said the product should not be mixed with other chemicals as the strong smell can cause headaches and nausea

‘Warning, don’t mix Di-San with other chemicals!’ Anne said in a Facebook group.

‘I used this mix to clean grout on floor. Yes it worked.

‘But this mix of Di-San and Mould Away gave me headaches and nausea and I did think about checking the labels!’

Others part of the online group thanked Anne for the information as they were unaware about mixing chemicals, while others said this is ‘common sense’. 

She first noticed the warning on the back of the product that stated the stain remover should not be combined with other products

She first noticed the warning on the back of the product that stated the stain remover should not be combined with other products

‘Thanks for sharing your experience and for reminding us to always check the labels regardless of all the new trends popping out of the net,’ one woman said.

‘Do not mix any chemicals together – they are toxic as it is,’ another said.

‘A good general rule for all chemicals,’ a third added.

In July, Australians were warned of the potential dangers of mixing bleach and vinegar together to create a disinfectant for the house.

Consumer experts from CHOICE warned the two common cleaning agents should never be used at the same time because it releases toxic fumes.

‘Warning: Never mix bleach and vinegar together – it creates toxic chlorine gas,’ the experts said.

Australians have been warned of the potential dangers of mixing bleach and vinegar together to create a disinfectant for the house (stock image)

Australians have been warned of the potential dangers of mixing bleach and vinegar together to create a disinfectant for the house (stock image)

Inhaling the toxic vapours can lead to coughing, breathing problems, allergic reactions and even nasty chemical burns. 

CHEMICALS YOU SHOULD NEVER MIX 

Bleach + Vinegar

Baking Soda + Vinegar

Bleach + Ammonia

Drain Cleaner + Drain Cleaner

Hydrogen Peroxide + Vinegar

Bleach + Rubbing Alcohol 

Source: Good House Keeping 

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It’s a common cleaning mistake many people make, as cleaning experts have warned for years that adding any acidic to bleach will produce a toxic chlorine vapour.

Before you get rid of the mould in your home, the experts from CHOICE said the first thing you need to do is assess the surface the fungi has attached to.  

‘If the mould is on something that’s super-porous, like a textile, clothing or furniture, there’s a good chance it can’t be completely removed and it may need to be thrown out,’ they said.

‘Non-porous’ surfaces such as hard plastics should be relatively easier to clean.

For those struggling to remove mould in bathroom grout or silicone, the experts explained that once the fungi gets its grip in these areas, it’s ‘almost impossible’ to rid of it.

‘When mould grows, it develops hyphae, or roots, which grow into the grout or silicone. You can clean the surfaces of the grout or silicone, but not deep into it. In those cases you have to replace the silicone or re-grout your bathroom,’ they said.

Consumer experts from CHOICE warned the two common cleaning agents should never be used at the same time because it releases toxic fumes

Consumer experts from CHOICE warned the two common cleaning agents should never be used at the same time because it releases toxic fumes

The experts suggested using diluted vinegar on hard surfaces, which causes mould to ‘overeat and die’.

To create a cleaning solution, simply pour a concentration of 80 per cent vinegar to 20 per cent water into three buckets.

Use a microfibre cloth in the first bucket to clean a patch of mould.

‘The same microfibre cloth should then be rinsed in the second bucket, then rinsed again in the third to ensure cross-contamination doesn’t occur,’ the experts said.

The experts explained that bleach can kill fungi but it needs to be at a 10 per cent concentration to work. 

‘Even at a higher potency, bleach won’t penetrate porous materials, so if the mould is growing on plaster, grout or wood, it will kill mould on the surface, but not below it,’ they said.

‘Bleach takes the colour, or melanin, out of fungi, making it invisible. You can’t see it anymore, so you think the bleach has done its job, when that’s not necessarily the case.’

There are simple things to do to prevent mould from returning to the home, such as fixing any leaky roof or broken pipes, and avoid air drying clothes indoors.

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