Kate Middleton is elegant in a £10 Zara dress to announce Hold Still top 100 images

The Duchess of Cambridge proved she remains queen of the High Street by wearing a £10 green floral dress from Zara as she announced the top 100 images from her community photography exhibition have been chosen. 

Joining a panel of five judges to select the best images from over 31,000 pictures submitted for the national-wide contest, Kate Middleton, 38, wore the beautiful V-neck midi dress which was slashed from £50 in the sale. 

The Duchess glowed in the khaki number with a black and white floral print which is made from at least 50 per cent viscose – a sustainable material made from natural sources – and has a beautiful lace trim detailing. 

Kate is often seen mixing designer with high street, and is known for her love of Spanish brand Zara. 

The Duchess of Cambridge, 38, proved she remains the queen of the high street as she stunned in a khaki V-neck midi dress from Zara which cost just £10 in the summer sale

The Duchess of Cambridge, 38, proved she remains the queen of the high street as she stunned in a khaki V-neck midi dress from Zara which cost just £10 in the summer sale 

The floral dress comes with short ruched sleeves and an elasticated waist band, helping to cover up some areas you may wish to hide. 

Although not visible on camera, Kate’s dress also features a ruffled hem and slit down the side to make it easy to walk in.  

Unfortunately, those hoping to replicate the Duchess’s style may struggle to buy one, with the popular dress now sold out on the Zara website.  

The Duchess, a patron of the National Portrait Gallery and a keen amateur photographer, spearheaded the campaign in a bid to capture a snapshot of the UK at this time, with the help of the nation. 

Kate opted for the midi dress from Zara, which is now sold out online, while speaking as part of the Hold Still photography campaign which she launched during the coronavirus lockdown

Kate opted for the midi dress from Zara, which is now sold out online, while speaking as part of the Hold Still photography campaign which she launched during the coronavirus lockdown

The elegant dress, a bargain at just £10, also has ruched sleeves, a ruffled hem and a slit down the left leg

The elegant dress, a bargain at just £10, also has ruched sleeves, a ruffled hem and a slit down the left leg

The royal wore her hair in a relaxed side parting, and opted for a set of drop earrings for the occasion. 

Announcing that the top 100 images had been selected, the Duchess said: ‘I’ve been so overwhelmed by the public’s response to Hold Still, the quality of the images has been extraordinary, and the poignancy and the stories behind the images have been equally as moving as well.’ 

She continued: ‘So I wanted to say a huge thank you to everyone who has entered and taken part. 

‘And a big thank you to my fellow judges. I hugely appreciate the time and dedication that they have shown towards the project.’ 

The Duchess of Cambridge joined a panel of five judges to select the top 100 images for her Hold Still photography contest. Pictured is  Nicholas Cullinan, Director of the National Portrait Gallery (top left),  Ruth May, Chief Nursing Officer for England (top right), Maryam Wahid, photographer (bottom left), and Lemn Sissay MBE, writer and poet (bottom right)

The Duchess of Cambridge joined a panel of five judges to select the top 100 images for her Hold Still photography contest. Pictured is  Nicholas Cullinan, Director of the National Portrait Gallery (top left),  Ruth May, Chief Nursing Officer for England (top right), Maryam Wahid, photographer (bottom left), and Lemn Sissay MBE, writer and poet (bottom right)

Kate appeared relaxed on the call, where she joined  Nicholas Cullinan, Director of the National Portrait Gallery, Lemn Sissay MBE, writer and poet, Ruth May, Chief Nursing Officer for England and Maryam Wahid, photographer, to select the top 100 images submitted.  

Meanwhile Lemn said the experience had tugged at the heartstrings, revealing: ‘I didn’t expect the judging process to be so emotional. 

‘As I studied the portraits in this most public crisis I was drawn into the most private moments.

‘A nation through portraiture. Intimacy and inspiration, bravery and hope, determination and love and loss and laughter… 

This is one of the photos selected by the Duchess of Cambridge ahead of showcasing the final 100 images in a digital exhibition from September 14

This is one of the photos selected by the Duchess of Cambridge ahead of showcasing the final 100 images in a digital exhibition from September 14

This is one of the photos selected by the Duchess of Cambridge ahead of showcasing the final 100 images in a digital exhibition from September 14

This is one of the photos selected by the Duchess of Cambridge ahead of showcasing the final 100 images in a digital exhibition from September 14

‘We have been in this together and in these portraits of private struggles and victories, the quiet moments, the tears and laughter are caught on camera for ever in Hold Still.’

She added that the collection of portraits ‘made her proud to be British’, saying: ‘It made me proud of my fellow citizens. It made me remember who we are and what we have been through. I didn’t really know until now.’  

People from across the UK were invited to submit a photographic portrait which they have taken during these extraordinary times for the community project.

Participants were also encouraged to provide a short written submission to outline the experiences and emotions of those depicted in their photograph. 

This is one of the photos selected by the Duchess of Cambridge ahead of showcasing the final 100 images in a digital exhibition from September 14

This is one of the photos selected by the Duchess of Cambridge ahead of showcasing the final 100 images in a digital exhibition from September 14

Hold Still was completely free, open to all ages and abilities, with the exhibition set to focus on three core themes – ‘Helpers and Heroes’, ‘Your New Normal’ and ‘Acts of Kindness’. 

The idea was to create a unique photographic portrait of the people of our nation in lockdown as we ‘hold still’ for the good of others, and celebrate those who have continued so we can stay safe.

The exhibition will reflect resilience and bravery, humour and sadness, creativity and kindness, and human tragedy and hope.

Hold Still will also act as a reminder of the significance of human connection in times of adversity, and that although we were physically apart, as a community and nation, we all faced and rose to the challenge together.

The top 100 photographs will be exhibited in online from 14 September, with selected images shown in towns and cities across the country later in the year.  

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