Harry and Meghan share eight stunning photos taken by the Duke to mark Earth Day

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex have shared a series of impressive wildlife photographs taken by Prince Harry to mark Earth Day on their Instagram account.

In a gallery post shared with their 4.9million followers this afternoon, the couple said that today was an ‘opportunity to learn about, celebrate and continue to safeguard our planet, our home’.

The first picture showed the pair holding hands, with Meghan lovingly gazing at her husband, while in Rotorua, New Zealand.

However the following eight pictures showed Harry’s skill behind the camera and captured his up-close encounters while visiting other countries.

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex, pictured in Rotorua, New Zealand, during a visit in October 2018, have shared a series of pictures taken by Prince Harry to mark Earth Day today and raise awareness of environmental issues with their followers

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex, pictured in Rotorua, New Zealand, during a visit in October 2018, have shared a series of pictures taken by Prince Harry to mark Earth Day today and raise awareness of environmental issues with their followers

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex, pictured in Rotorua, New Zealand, during a visit in October 2018, have shared a series of pictures taken by Prince Harry to mark Earth Day today and raise awareness of environmental issues with their followers

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The first of two black and white images, pictured, showed 'Africa's Unicorn, the rhino' resting its head on a branch. The caption reminded Instagram followers that humans are the biggest threat to the animals, who have survived 'ice ages' in 2019

The first of two black and white images, pictured, showed 'Africa's Unicorn, the rhino' resting its head on a branch. The caption reminded Instagram followers that humans are the biggest threat to the animals, who have survived 'ice ages' in 2019

The first of two black and white images, pictured, showed ‘Africa’s Unicorn, the rhino’ resting its head on a branch. The caption reminded Instagram followers that humans are the biggest threat to the animals, who have survived ‘ice ages’ in 2019

The first image, posted in black and white, showed ‘Africa’s Unicorn’ – a large rhino, resting its head on a branch.

The caption read: ‘Africa’s Unicorn, the rhino. These magnificent animals have survived ice ages and giant crocodiles, amongst other things! 

‘They have adapted to Earth’s changing climate continually for over 30 million years. Yet here we are in 2019 where their biggest threat is us.’

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex then shared a picture of two feathers in front of a  sunset and took the opportunity to remind followers that humans are affecting eco-systems.

A picture showing two feathers in front of a sunset on the Okavango Delta was also taken by Prince Harry and shared today. The caption reminded followers that humans are affecting eco-systems and the abundance of wildlife around the world

A picture showing two feathers in front of a sunset on the Okavango Delta was also taken by Prince Harry and shared today. The caption reminded followers that humans are affecting eco-systems and the abundance of wildlife around the world

A picture showing two feathers in front of a sunset on the Okavango Delta was also taken by Prince Harry and shared today. The caption reminded followers that humans are affecting eco-systems and the abundance of wildlife around the world

Another shot, pictured, shared by the Sussexes was a close up of a lion's eye. The post revealed that 'desert lions are critically endangered' and that only four per cent of mammals on the earth are still wild animals

Another shot, pictured, shared by the Sussexes was a close up of a lion's eye. The post revealed that 'desert lions are critically endangered' and that only four per cent of mammals on the earth are still wild animals

Another shot, pictured, shared by the Sussexes was a close up of a lion’s eye. The post revealed that ‘desert lions are critically endangered’ and that only four per cent of mammals on the earth are still wild animals

The caption said: ‘A critical ecosystem, Botswana’s Okavango Delta sustains millions of people and an abundance of wildlife. 

‘Huge bush fires, predominantly started by humans, are altering the entire river system; the ash kills the fish as the flood comes in and the trees that don’t burn become next year’s kindling.’

Another black and white picture featuring petrified trees in Botswana was intended to show how humans have encroached on habitats, while one especially artsy shot taken by Harry reveals a close-up of a lion’s eye.

The post on the Sussex Royal account read: ‘Desert lions are critically endangered due partly to human wildlife conflict, habitat encroachment and climate change. 

‘Ninety six per cent of mammals on our earth are either livestock or humans, meaning only the four per cent remaining are wild animals.’

The Sussexes used this image of whales, also taken by Prince Harry, to illustrate that 'fishing sustainably can benefit us all' as 'orca and humpback whale populations are recovering in Norway thanks to the protection of their fisheries'

The Sussexes used this image of whales, also taken by Prince Harry, to illustrate that 'fishing sustainably can benefit us all' as 'orca and humpback whale populations are recovering in Norway thanks to the protection of their fisheries'

The Sussexes used this image of whales, also taken by Prince Harry, to illustrate that ‘fishing sustainably can benefit us all’ as ‘orca and humpback whale populations are recovering in Norway thanks to the protection of their fisheries’

A picture of whales addressed the issue of sustainable fishing on the Earth Day thread. 

It stated: ‘Orca and Humpback whale populations are recovering in Norway thanks to the protection of their fisheries. Proof that fishing sustainably can benefit us all.’

Towards the end of the Instagram post, the Sussexes again raised the issue of changing environments and shared an image of lush trees taken in Guyana to address deforestation. 

The caption read: ‘Roughly three-quarters of Guyana is forested, its forests are highly diverse with 1,263 known species of wildlife and 6,409 species of plants. 

‘Many countries continue to try and deforest there for the global demand for timber.’

The Sussexes also raised the issue of plastic in the ocean on their Earth Day Instagram post in this picture of waste washed up on the shore and highlighted that, as well as environmental problems, micro plastics can cause medical ones for us too

The Sussexes also raised the issue of plastic in the ocean on their Earth Day Instagram post in this picture of waste washed up on the shore and highlighted that, as well as environmental problems, micro plastics can cause medical ones for us too

The Sussexes also raised the issue of plastic in the ocean on their Earth Day Instagram post in this picture of waste washed up on the shore and highlighted that, as well as environmental problems, micro plastics can cause medical ones for us too

This vibrant picture taken by Prince Harry highlighted the issue of deforestation in Guyana. The Sussexes wrote that roughly three-quarters of Guyana is forested and there's 1,263 known species of wildlife and 6,409 species of plants in them

This vibrant picture taken by Prince Harry highlighted the issue of deforestation in Guyana. The Sussexes wrote that roughly three-quarters of Guyana is forested and there's 1,263 known species of wildlife and 6,409 species of plants in them

This vibrant picture taken by Prince Harry highlighted the issue of deforestation in Guyana. The Sussexes wrote that roughly three-quarters of Guyana is forested and there’s 1,263 known species of wildlife and 6,409 species of plants in them

The couple, who are expecting their first child very soon, then discussed the issue of plastic in the ocean and how this doesn’t just cause environmental problems, but ‘medical problems for ourselves too’.

‘We all now know the damage plastics are causing to our oceans,’ the caption read.

‘Micro plastics are also ending up in our food source, creating not just environmental problems for our planet but medical problems for ourselves too.’

Prince Harry’s final picture highlighted the work of African Parks Network, who have relocated 500 elephants in Malawi to help reduce pressure on human wildlife conflict. 

Two black and white pictures were included in the gallery. This picture was used to comment on the problem of bush fires that are altering the river system in Botswana's Okavango Delta and that trees that don’t burn become next year’s kindling

Two black and white pictures were included in the gallery. This picture was used to comment on the problem of bush fires that are altering the river system in Botswana's Okavango Delta and that trees that don’t burn become next year’s kindling

Two black and white pictures were included in the gallery. This picture was used to comment on the problem of bush fires that are altering the river system in Botswana’s Okavango Delta and that trees that don’t burn become next year’s kindling

The final of Prince Harry's pictures highlighted the work of African Parks Network who relocated 500 elephants in Malawi to help reduce pressure on human wildlife conflict. The caption explained elephants can cause havoc by intruding on farmland

The final of Prince Harry's pictures highlighted the work of African Parks Network who relocated 500 elephants in Malawi to help reduce pressure on human wildlife conflict. The caption explained elephants can cause havoc by intruding on farmland

The final of Prince Harry’s pictures highlighted the work of African Parks Network who relocated 500 elephants in Malawi to help reduce pressure on human wildlife conflict. The caption explained elephants can cause havoc by intruding on farmland

‘When a fenced area passes its carrying capacity for elephants, they start to encroach into farmland causing havoc for communities,’ the caption stated.

‘Here African Parks Network relocated 500 elephants to another park within Malawi to reduce the pressure on human wildlife conflict and create more dispersed tourism.’

The post ended on an encouraging note, saying: ‘Every one of us can make a difference, not just today but everyday.’

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