Emma Thompson reveals list of 20 things that help her deal low moments

Emma Thompson has revealed her mental health advice and the twenty rules she lives by to deal with her depression.  

The actress, 60, said her dealings with depression were ‘ironically undramatic,’ as The Sunday Times, shared her essay on the subject, taken from Scarlett Curtis’ new book called It’s Not OK To Be Blue (and Other Lies).   

Instead of delving into the difficulties of her own mental state, Emma revealed her coping mechanisms, which involve relying on a list of 20 bullet points to keep her spirits high. 

The list, which she admits is a reworking of Sydney Smith’s advice on mental health, includes avoiding toxic relationships, how we need to stop comparing ourselves to to others and that random acts of kindness can be ‘human anti-depressants’.

The book includes essays from other celebrities, such as Emilia Clarke and Lena Dunham, who have also revealed their mental health struggles too.

Renowned actress Emma Thompson, 60, revealed she relied on a list of 20 bullet points to make herself feel better when she was experiencing low mental health. Pictured at the Late Night Gala screening at Picturehouse Cnetral on May 20

Renowned actress Emma Thompson, 60, revealed she relied on a list of 20 bullet points to make herself feel better when she was experiencing low mental health. Pictured at the Late Night Gala screening at Picturehouse Cnetral on May 20

Renowned actress Emma Thompson, 60, revealed she relied on a list of 20 bullet points to make herself feel better when she was experiencing low mental health. Pictured at the Late Night Gala screening at Picturehouse Cnetral on May 20

The actress, 60, said her dealings with depression were 'ironically undramatic,'. Pictured: Arriving at the Say My Name gala screening in London in April

The actress, 60, said her dealings with depression were 'ironically undramatic,'. Pictured: Arriving at the Say My Name gala screening in London in April

The actress, 60, said her dealings with depression were ‘ironically undramatic,’. Pictured: Arriving at the Say My Name gala screening in London in April

Starting off her essays she said that: ‘Depression has so many faces, and some of them are positively demonic.’

She likened her state of mental health as being wrapped in a ‘cold, wet blanket.’  

‘To be alive is truly an extraordinary gift and when all seems sterile and empty, one simply has no access to it,’ she explained.  

In order to deal with her poor mental health, the actress said she had a few go-to tools, including relying a list of 20 things to help her look at the world in a more uplifting way. 

She admitted that she reworked the list from the 18th century writer, and added her own bullet points. 

While Thompson is known for her happy behaviour, the actress struggled with bouts of depression throughout her life. Pictured at the Amazon Studios screening of Late Night in April

While Thompson is known for her happy behaviour, the actress struggled with bouts of depression throughout her life. Pictured at the Amazon Studios screening of Late Night in April

While Thompson is known for her happy behaviour, the actress struggled with bouts of depression throughout her life. Pictured at the Amazon Studios screening of Late Night in April 

The Love Actually star said her first rule was to ‘live as enjoyably as possibly within your financial means’. 

She recommended not to think too far ahead and to avoid bingeing serial killer shows on streaming platforms – especially if they kept you up all night.

However when it came to relationships she added to keep your friends close – but to avoid any sort of toxic relationships. She said on the subject: ‘If your instincts tell you they are toxic, walk away and don’t look back.’ 

The list also warned against comparing yourself to others, but random acts of kindness can work as a ‘human anti-depressant.’

The eco-friendly actress also said to listen to David Attenborough, keep warm, and to form a ‘close bond with a local tree.’  

In 2010, the star revealed that working on the 1995 adaptation of Jane Austen's Sense and Sensibility kept her from 'going under.' Pictured: Thompson as Elinor Dashwood, in Sense and Sensibility 1995

In 2010, the star revealed that working on the 1995 adaptation of Jane Austen's Sense and Sensibility kept her from 'going under.' Pictured: Thompson as Elinor Dashwood, in Sense and Sensibility 1995

In 2010, the star revealed that working on the 1995 adaptation of Jane Austen’s Sense and Sensibility kept her from ‘going under.’ Pictured: Thompson as Elinor Dashwood, in Sense and Sensibility 1995 

Emma Thompson has opened up about her about her mental health in the past. In a Radio 4 interview from 2010, she revealed that working had kept her from ‘going under,’ and that she struggled with depression. 

‘I think I probably should have sought professional help long before I actually did,’ she said at the time. 

The actress added working on projects such as Sense and Sensibilities in the 1990’s, helped her escape from ‘the constant “must do better”, “must try harder” plus “you’re too fat and not really a very good mother.”‘ 

Actress and writer Lena Dunham also explained in her own essay how art therapy helped her when she checked herself in a mental health facility two years ago after going through years of anti-anxiety medication abuse

Actress and writer Lena Dunham also explained in her own essay how art therapy helped her when she checked herself in a mental health facility two years ago after going through years of anti-anxiety medication abuse

Actress and writer Lena Dunham also explained in her own essay how art therapy helped her when she checked herself in a mental health facility two years ago after going through years of anti-anxiety medication abuse

It's Not Ok to Feel Blue, by Scarlett Curtis, is a collection of essays from activists and celebrities recounting their own struggles with mental health. It includes a touching essay from Game of Thrones star Emilia Clarke.

It's Not Ok to Feel Blue, by Scarlett Curtis, is a collection of essays from activists and celebrities recounting their own struggles with mental health. It includes a touching essay from Game of Thrones star Emilia Clarke.

It’s Not Ok to Feel Blue, by Scarlett Curtis, is a collection of essays from activists and celebrities recounting their own struggles with mental health. It includes a touching essay from Game of Thrones star Emilia Clarke.

It’s Not Ok to Feel Blue, by Scarlett Curtis, is a collection of essays from activists and celebrities recounting their own struggles with mental health. 

It includes a touching essay from Game of Thrones star Emilia Clarke, revealing her feelings of anxiety as she recovered from a brain injury in 2011 in-between seasons of the HBO hit. 

Actress and writer Lena Dunham also explained in her own essay how art therapy helped her when she checked herself in a mental health facility two years ago after going through years of anti-anxiety medication abuse. 

It’s Not Ok to feel blue (and Other Lies) curated by Scarlett Curtis, will be published on October 3rd. 

Recommended


Hair Care Tips For Weave

Fashion Tips

Fashion Tips Plus Girls

Fashion Tips 2019