Britons can stay in this stunning 19th century Gothic tower – at a cost of £482 for two nights

The getaway plans of millions have been scuppered this summer by quarantine measures put in place to cover people returning some of the sunniest holiday destinations.

But inventive Brits looking closer to home could take advantage of this stunning Rapunzel-style tower, which stands in the picturesque Snowdonia National Park in North Wales. 

The 19th-Century Gothic folly, which is named Brynkir tower, is spread across six small one-room floors which are reached by a stone spiral staircase. 

A two-night stay is advertised on Sykes Holliday Cottages’ website for £482.  

The 19th-Century Rapunzel-style Brynkir Tower stands in Snowdonia National Park in Wales and is set across six floors (pictured)

The 19th-Century Rapunzel-style Brynkir Tower stands in Snowdonia National Park in Wales and is set across six floors (pictured)

Inside, there are two bedrooms (one double and one twin), both of which are accessed by the stone spiral staircase which runs through the tower

Inside, there are two bedrooms (one double and one twin), both of which are accessed by the stone spiral staircase which runs through the tower

There is also a bathroom with an ornate roll-top bath (pictured), which visitors can relax and enjoy the view through the window

There is also a bathroom with an ornate roll-top bath (pictured), which visitors can relax and enjoy the view through the window

Inside, there are two bedrooms (one double and one twin), a living room, kitchen and bathroom which is fitted with a roll-top bath. 

And the living room is the crowning glory because it sits at the very top of the tower, providing incredible views of rolling countryside in every direction. 

Ornate arched windows provide a view from every floor, whilst the building’s heavy wooden door gives a hint of its age. 

However, the tower has also been renovated and so has WiFi access, along with a TV and DVD player and fully-equipped kitchen.  

The cosy kitchen could also host a relaxing family dinner after a day or exploring the countryside (pictured)

The cosy kitchen could also host a relaxing family dinner after a day or exploring the countryside (pictured)

Ornate arched windows provide a view from every floor, whilst the building's heavy wooden door gives a hint of its history (pictured)

Ornate arched windows provide a view from every floor, whilst the building’s heavy wooden door gives a hint of its history (pictured)

The living room is the crowning glory because it sits at the very top of the tower, providing incredible views of rolling countryside in every direction (pictured)

The living room is the crowning glory because it sits at the very top of the tower, providing incredible views of rolling countryside in every direction (pictured)

The tower has also been renovated and so has WiFi access, along with a TV and DVD player. Pictured, the living room

The tower has also been renovated and so has WiFi access, along with a TV and DVD player. Pictured, the living room

Work on building the tower began in 1821, under the direction of Captain Joseph Huddart. Pictured: The beautifully-furnished double bedroom

Work on building the tower began in 1821, under the direction of Captain Joseph Huddart. Pictured: The beautifully-furnished double bedroom

According to ManorCastles.com, work on building the tower began in 1821, under the direction of Captain Joseph Huddart, the High Sheriff of Caernarfonshire. 

His father, who was also a captain and named Joseph, had owned the surrounding estate since 1809 after making a fortune from the invention of a steam-driven industrial rope binder. 

After the land passed into his hands, Huddart began to renovate it and the now-ruined manor called Brynkir Hall, the remains of which stand near the tower. 

After his death, Huddart junior continued his restoration by building the Gothic tower. 

Visitors could sit down and have a read in front of this window, which looks out onto the Welsh landscape (pictured)

Visitors could sit down and have a read in front of this window, which looks out onto the Welsh landscape (pictured)

The tower and the estate remained with the Huddart family until 1910, when bankruptcy saw it pass into the hands of the Government. Pictured: The bathroom and its mammoth antique sink

The tower and the estate remained with the Huddart family until 1910, when bankruptcy saw it pass into the hands of the Government. Pictured: The bathroom and its mammoth antique sink

Visitors to the tower could hike up Mount Snowdon itself - it is less than 20 miles away - or explore the stunning villages and scenery nearby

Visitors to the tower could hike up Mount Snowdon itself – it is less than 20 miles away – or explore the stunning villages and scenery nearby

It and the surrounding estate remained with the Huddart family until 1910, but bankruptcy then saw the Government take ownership. 

The tower and hall did then have a brief stint as a World War One prisoner of war camp, before the latter was largely demolished in the 1920s. 

The estate was broken up and sold off in 1930 and the tower remained derelict until the 1990s, when it was renovated. 

Visitors to the tower could hike up Mount Snowdon itself – it is less than 20 miles away – or explore the stunning villages and scenery nearby.  

The tower is fully booked until November and the shortest available stay is for two nights, at a cost of £482.   

The tower is fully booked until November and the shortest available stay is for two nights, at a cost of £482

The tower is fully booked until November and the shortest available stay is for two nights, at a cost of £482

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