American Psycho author, 55, blasts sheltered millennials – despite dating 32-year-old

The author of American Psycho has claimed that millennial’s think of themselves as victims and don’t read, despite dating a 32-year-old.

Bret Easton Ellis, 55, from Los Angeles, who had his first novel published at just 21, dating pop singer Todd Michael Schultz, who is 32.

Ellis went on to write American Psycho, published in 1991 and it was made into a film in 2000 starring Christian Bale. 

He told The Sunday Times magazine: ‘I mean, what is millennial culture? It kind of disturbs me. There’s no writing. They don’t care about literature. None of them read books. Where is the great millennial novel?’ 

The author also criticised the younger generation who claim to have ’20 allergies’ and carry small dogs around with them as ‘security’. 

Bret Easton Ellis, 55, from Los Angeles, who had his first novel published at just 21, is currently dating pop singer Todd Michael Schultz

Bret Easton Ellis, 55, from Los Angeles, who had his first novel published at just 21, is currently dating pop singer Todd Michael Schultz

Bret Easton Ellis, 55, from Los Angeles, who had his first novel published at just 21, is currently dating pop singer Todd Michael Schultz

Ellis have been dating millennial Schultz for ten years, but despite being in a relationship with a 32-year-old, he believes the younger generation is different to when he was growing up

Ellis have been dating millennial Schultz for ten years, but despite being in a relationship with a 32-year-old, he believes the younger generation is different to when he was growing up

Ellis have been dating millennial Schultz for ten years, but despite being in a relationship with a 32-year-old, he believes the younger generation is different to when he was growing up

Despite criticizing millennials’ lack of reading and writing skills when the interviewer asked him if he’s read Sally Rooney’s Normal People – said to be the ‘great millennial novel’ he hadn’t even heard of it.

Ellis have been dating millennial Schultz for ten years, but despite dating him he still sees the younger generation different to when he was growing up.

The author also went on to say that millennials like to think of themselves as victims: ‘I did not know a single person growing up who was afflicted by 20 different allergies and needed to carry a badger on to a plane as a security animal.

‘I see these kids in over-sized sunglasses, clutching a poodle with a little security tag.’ 

The author also questioned social media, calling Instagram a 'fake place' and noting that his boyfriend's (pictured) friends post pictures of themselves looking happy, even though he knows they are miserable

The author also questioned social media, calling Instagram a 'fake place' and noting that his boyfriend's (pictured) friends post pictures of themselves looking happy, even though he knows they are miserable

The author also questioned social media, calling Instagram a ‘fake place’ and noting that his boyfriend’s (pictured) friends post pictures of themselves looking happy, even though he knows they are miserable

In February Ellis questioned whether Black Panther deserved its best picture nomination, asking if the the Academy pushed it for the sake of diversity and not for its quality

In February Ellis questioned whether Black Panther deserved its best picture nomination, asking if the the Academy pushed it for the sake of diversity and not for its quality

In February Ellis questioned whether Black Panther deserved its best picture nomination, asking if the the Academy pushed it for the sake of diversity and not for its quality

He also questioned social media, calling Instagram a ‘fake place’. He carried on that his boyfriend friends post pictures of them looking happy, even though he knows they are miserable.

Its not the first time that the author has been outspoken about certain subjects.

In February he questioned whether Black Panther deserved its best picture nomination, asking if the the Academy pushed it for the sake of diversity and not for its quality.

The screenwriter and director said no one in Hollywood ‘thinks ‘Black Panther’ is that good as a movie’ but ‘as a piece of representation, they are supporting it’, The Wrap reports.

Speaking on the B.E.E. podcast he said ‘it’s all fake news, folks’, calling the ‘culture’ the Oscars is pushing ‘rather nauseating’.